Check Indian, Afghan Dams For Floods In Pakistan

  • Indian company controls dam on Kabul River, tens of dams control flow of Kashmir water into Sindh, Punjab, Balochistan
  • Flood gates of Afghan Sarobi Dam, Indian Baglihar Dam were opened to drown Pakistani plains
  • Two US allies, the puppet regime in Kabul and the ‘strategic ally’ in New Delhi, declare water war on Pakistan
  • The tragedy one again raises question marks on the US double game against Pakistan in the region
  • Melting glaciers have nothing to do with this tragedy; it also doesn’t explain why Kabul river surged

It’s not as if the clouds dodged borders and focused on Pakistan only. Pakistan’s water flows from Indian-occupied Kashmir and from US-occupied Afghanistan. A natural deluge should have shown some spillover effect into Indian and Afghan regions adjoining Pakistan. It is interesting that a second and a third wave of floods is expected in Pakistan when there’s no rain to justify it. Where is the water coming from? Here’s a perspective by Mr. Zaid Hamid, a security analyst at BrassTacks, and Ms. Gulpari Mehsud, a researcher at PakNationalists.com.


By ZAID HAMID & GULPARI MEHSUD

WWW.PAKNATIONALISTS.COM

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan—There is a very sinister aspect to the floods in Pakistan that no one is discussing in the media. While there were rains and flooding in some rivers of the country, the size, scale and the gush of water suddenly pumped into these rivers defies logic. This is especially true considering that rains have slowed down since the breakout of the floods on 29 July.

It is two weeks since the rains stopped but water continues to rise in the rivers Indus and Chenab. There was no flooding in India or in Afghanistan. Never before have rivers in all the provinces of Pakistan flooded at the same time without a similar act affecting the upstream, the source. While some parts of the country, like some areas of Khyber Pakhtun Khwa saw flooding in 1929, the simultaneous floods covering all of Pakistan and in all of the rivers flowing in from Afghanistan and Indian-occupied Kashmir is something truly unprecedented.

The speed and quantity of the gushing water and the short span of time in which it picked momentum preclude the possibility that melting glaciers are solely responsible for the floods.

There is no evidence that suggests that glaciers decided to melt at a faster speed just in time for the heavy monsoon rains.

There is every likelihood that what we are seeing today is that the Indians and the US-backed regime in Kabul are using water as a weapon for the first time to deluge Pakistan. There is no doubt about it.

From an initial look at the data, it seems that a natural spill of heavy rain was exploited by releasing water reservoirs in Indian-occupied Kashmir and on river Kabul. Let’s remember that the Met Office in Pakistan had already forecast heavy rains almost ten days before the first downpour. Different people received this news in different ways. Pakistani politicians, inept and incompetent as usual, slept over it. The anti-Pakistan terrorists based on Afghan soil and supported by several countries used this information to exacerbate terror against Pakistani citizens in the southwestern province of Balochistan, knowing that the State machinery would be distracted.

Interestingly, even when it comes to water, it is Indians who are sitting to the left and right of Pakistan’s borders and controlling it’s flow. The dam on Kabul river is handled by Indian personnel, while tens of dams choke Pakistan from the side of occupied Kashmir.

RIVER KABUL

In February, the Obama administration organized a meeting for senior government officials in Kabul and Islamabad who handle agricultural issues. The meeting was strangely held in Doha, Qatar, on US request. The agenda was to force the Pakistanis to grant agricultural concessions to the US-propped government in Kabul, without Pakistan getting anything in return.

But in the meeting, Mr. Zahoor Malik, a senior Pakistani bureaucrat leading the Pakistani delegation, raised the issue of an Indian company with close links to the Indian government building a dam on river Kabul near the border with Pakistan. It is not clear what the Americans and Karzai’s officials had to say about this. There is a track record, however, that the incumbent pro-US government in Islamabad has often swept such issues under the carpet in order not to jeopardize Washington’s support for the Zardari government.

All major rivers flowing into Pakistan including the Indus are blocked by Indian-built dams.

US and British officials often defend India and dismiss Pakistani concerns as ‘conspiracy theories.’ Some Pakistani analysts accuse elements within US government and intelligence of using Afghan soil against Pakistan.

But imagine this: India, a country that faces a debilitating conflict over Kashmir with Pakistan, goes to build tens of small and medium sized dams on all the rivers flowing down to Pakistan, and everything is supposed to work out smoothly? Not possible, even theoretically. But luckily Indian actions on the ground more than strengthen Pakistani concerns.

After the first wave of floods, the other rivers were flowing normally and no extraordinary rains followed. But suddenly Chenab and Indus Rivers overflowed and the flow picked up speed, turning into a flood. India’s Baghliar Dam in occupied Kashmir opened its flood gates to cause a tragedy in the plains of Pakistan [Sindh and Punjab]. While Sarobi Dam – the Indian-maintained dam near Kabul – controls the flow of Kabul River entering Pakistan. The same thing happened here. Monsoons did not lash Afghanistan and there was no flooding there of any magnitude. But again, strangely, water flowing from river Kabul into Pakistan dramatically picked up speed as water levels increased turning into a flood. The speed with which this transformation occurred could have happened only because of one of two reasons: massive rains in Afghanistan or because Sarobi Dam released large amounts of water over a sustainable period of time.

PAKISTANI POLITICIANS

ANP, a US-allied party with strong links to Kabul and New Delhi and ruling the Pakistani northwestern province, has always opposed the construction of the Kalabagh Dam which would have saved thousands of lives and property had it been there. The ANP has argued that building the dam would drown the city of Nowshehra. Ironically, ANP’s lie was exposed when not only Nowshehra but also Charsadda drowned without the Kalabagh Dam being there and thanks to the artificial floods created in Kabul River by ANP’s Indian and Afghan patrons. Read more of this post

Pakistan in pictures

Flag of Pakistan

Map of Pakistan

Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah: The Founder of Pakistan

Dr. Allama Mohammad Iqbal: National Poet, Philosopher,Thinker

National Anthem of Pakistan

National Anthem of Pakistan ( in Urdu )

National Anthem of Pakistan in English

Pakistan's National Monument was built in the Shakarparian Hills, at the west viewpoint overlooking the capital city Islamabad, Pakistan. Built with expensive red granite marble the shape is that of a blossoming flower, with petals. The four main petals of the monument represent the four provinces of Pakistan: Balochistan, North West Frontier Province, Punjab, and Sindh. In the large view you can see some murals of famous monuments which are located in the respective provinces. And the three smaller petals represent the Northern areas, Kashmir and the country’s tribal areas.

Minar-e-Pakistan is a tall minaret in Iqbal Park Lahore, built in commemoration of the Pakistan Resolution. The minaret reflects a blend of Mughal and modern architecture, and is constructed on the site where on March 23, 1940, seven years before the formation of Pakistan, the Muslim League passed the Pakistan Resolution (Qarardad-e-Pakistan), demanding the creation of Pakistan. This was the first official declaration to establish a separate homeland for the Muslims living in the South Asia. Pakistan now celebrates this day as a national holiday each year.

Mazar-e-Quaid (Urdu: مزار قائد) or the National Mausoleum refers to the tomb of the founder of Pakistan, Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah. It is an iconic symbol of Karachi throughout the world. The mausoleum completed in the 1960s, is situated at the heart of the city.

Khyber gate: Entrance to Khyber pass and Torkham border of Afghanistan from Peshawar, North Western Pakistan.

Ziarat, Balochistan, Pakistan

Jasmine: National flower

Cedrus deodara: National tree

Peregrine Falcon is the state bird of the country recognized as "Shaheen" and officially the military iconic symbol of the PAF

Chukar: National bird (official)

Asiatic Lion: National animal (unofficial)

Markhor: National animal

Indus Dolphin: National Mammal; is only found in the Indus River in Pakistan

National Game: Field hockey; Pakistan is 4-time world champion (1971, 1978, 1982, 1994 )and 3-time Olympics champion (1960, 1968, 1984) while Pakistan also won Champions Trophy for 3 time ( 1978 , 1980, 1994 ).

Cricket: Pakistan 1992 World Champion

Pakistan: ICC T20 World Cup 2009 winner

Shahid Khan Afridi: currently holds the highest career strike rate in the history of international cricket and the world record of Fastest Century

Wasim Akram: a former Pakistani Cricketr. Widely regarded as one of the finest fast bowlers ever, Akram holds world records for the most wickets taken in both ODIs and Test matches. Recently Wasim has been inducted in ICC Hall of Fame.

Shoaib Akhtar: Fastest bowler in the world. He set a world record by clocking 100mph

Jahangir Khan: is a former World No. 1 professional Squash player from Pakistan, who is considered by many to be the greatest player in the history of the game. During his career he won the World Open six times and the British Open a record ten times. Between 1981 and 1986, he was unbeaten in competitive play for five years. During that time he won 555 matches consecutively. This was not only the longest winning streak in squash history, but also one of the longest unbeaten runs by any athlete in top-level professional sports.

Jan sher Khan: is a former World No. 1 professional Squash player from Pakistan, who is widely considered to be one of the greatest squash players of all time. During his career he won the World Open a record eight times, and the British Open six times.

Minar-e-Pakistan

Badshahi Mosque - Lahore

Food street - Lahore

National Stadium - Karachi

Baltoro glacier - Pakistan

The Karakoram Highway (KKH) (Urdu: شاہراہ قراقرم, Chinese: 喀喇昆仑公路) is the highest paved international road in the world. It connects China and Pakistan across the Karakoram mountain range, through the Khunjerab Pass, at an altitude of 4,693 m/15,397 ft as confirmed by both SRTM and multiple GPS readings. It connects China's Xinjiang region with Pakistan's Gilgit-Baltistan and also serves as a popular tourist attraction. Due to its high elevation and the difficult conditions in which it was constructed, it is also referred to as the "8th Wonder of the World."

The Karakoram Highway

Beautifully painted Pakistani trucks along the Karakoram Highway, Pakistan. The Karakoram Highway connects northern Pakistan with far north-western China via the Khunjerab Pass (4693m) and is the highest international road in the world.

Bualtar Glacier, Hoper, Pakistan

Hunza Valley - Pakistan

The Faisal Mosque in Islamabad is the largest mosque in Pakistan and South Asia and one of the largest mosques in the world. It was the largest mosque in the world from 1986 to 1993 when overtaken in size by the completion of the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca, Morocco. Subsequent expansions of the Masjid al-Haram (Grand Mosque) of Mecca and the Al-Masjid al-Nabawi (Prophet's Mosque) in Medina, Saudi Arabia during the 1990s relegated Faisal Mosque to fourth place in terms of size. It is conceived as the National Mosque of Pakistan.The Faisal Mosque is named after the late King Faisal bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia, who supported and financed the project.

The Badshahi Mosque (Urdu: بادشاھی مسجد) or the 'King's Mosque' in Lahore, commissioned by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb in 1671 and completed in 1673, is the second largest mosque in Pakistan and South Asia and the fifth largest mosque in the world. Epitomising the beauty, passion and grandeur of the Mughal era, it is Lahore's most famous landmark and a major tourist attraction.

It is capable of accommodating 5,000 worshippers in its main prayer hall and a further 95,000 in its courtyard and porticoes, it remained the largest mosque in the world from 1673 to 1986 (a period of 313 years), when overtaken in size by the completion of the Faisal Mosque in Islamabad. Today, it remains the second largest mosque in Pakistan and South Asia and the fifth largest mosque in the world after the Masjid al-Haram (Grand Mosque) of Mecca, the Al-Masjid al-Nabawi (Prophet's Mosque) in Medina, the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca and the Faisal Mosque in Islamabad.

The mausoleum of Sheikh Rukn-i-Alam. Multan, Pakistan

Hanna Lake (Urdu: حانا جھيل) is a lake near Quetta city in Pakistan and is one of the main attractions in the city. The lake is located a little short of the place where the Urak Valley begins and 10 km from Quetta. Golden fish in the lake comes swimming right up to the edge of the lake.

Lake Saif-ul-Malook, Nothern areas, Pakistan

Shandur Polo festival, Pakistan

Mahodand Lake, Kalam, Pakistan

Karachi, Pakistan

Karachi, Pakistan

Pakistan’s M2 motorway: For sheer spotlessness, efficiency and emptiness there is nothing like the M2 in the rest of South Asia

Motorway connecting Islamabad and Lahore, Pakistan

M2 Motorway from Lahore to Islamabad, Pakistan

M1 Motorway from Islamabad to Peshawar, Pakistan

Gwadar, Pakistan

Shangrila Lake, Pakistan

Neelum Valley, Pakistan

Typical Neelum Valley village, Pakistan

Pakistani Girls In Traditional Dress: Pakistani girls representing the four provinces of Pakistan seen here in traditional garb. Such costumes are often seen on the 14th of August or the 23rd of March on Independence Day celebrations in Pakistan. The application of face paint indicates that they are dressed up as either Pakhtun or Baluchi women, while the girl on the left is from the eastern Indus Valley region of Sindh or Punjab. (From left to right: Sindhi dress, Pakhtun and Baluchi dress)

Kalash People of Pakistan

Kalash Valley, Pakistan

Sunflower fields in Khanewal, Punjab, Pakistan

Tent pegging, A passion of Punjabi and a thrilling game, very famous in central Punjab, Pakistan.

Murree, Pakistan

Murree (Pakistan) in winter. Road blockade due to land sliding

Glowing Fountain and Oyster Rocks in arabian sea, Karachi, Pakistan

Karachi: An aerial view of Pakistan's port city of Karachi, the city of lights. Copyright Mohsin Hassan

Karachi - The City of Lights, Pakistan

Miani Horr, Balochistan, Pakistan

Shogran in the Kaghan Valley, NWFP, Pakistan

Islamabad, Pakistan

Islamabad, Pakistan - sunset at Blue Area

7th Avenue Islamabad- Bird's eye view, as seen from Daman-e-Koh (Margallah Hills), Islamabad - Pakistan

Rawal Lake located in the outskirts of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, is considered to be a paradise on earth that one must not be miss. Rawal Lake is an artificial reservoir in Pakistan that fullfills the water demands for the cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad. This artificial lake covers an area of 8.8 km². Rawal Lake is located within an isolated section of the Margalla Hills National Park.

Heavenly View at Khanpur Lake...Some 50 kilometers north-west of Islamabad, on the road from Taxila to Haripur. One can indulge at this place away from city life.

Tarbela Dam- The world's largest earth-filled dam on one of the world's most important rivers - the Indus - is 103 km from Rawalpindi. The dam was completed in 1976 at a cost of Rs.18.5 billion. Over 15,000 Pakistani and 800 foreign workers and engineers worked during its construction. It is the biggest hydel power station in Pakistan having a capacity of generating 3,478 MW of electricity. Its reservoir is 97 km long with a depth of 137 meters while total area of the lake is 260 sq.km.

Mangla Dam- World's third largest earth-filled dam is only 115 km south-east of Rawalpindi.

Mangla Dam Water FLow

Kallar Kahar Lake, Pakistan

Rama Lake- Near Astore, Northern Pakistan

Satpara Lake, Sakardu, Pakistan: One of the largest fresh water lakes of the country.

Banjosa village is around 3 and a half hours drive from Islamabad and a 30 min drive from Rawalakot, district headquarter of Poonch District, in Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Pakistan

Banjosa , Azad Khasmir, Pakistan

Toli Peer Meadow, Northern Pakistan

Shyokh Valley near Kaphalu, Karakoram Range, Pakistan

Walking upwards through the Gasherbrum II Icefall, Karakoram Range, Pakistan

Shandur Valley - Vertorama, Pakistan

Sword Dance: The Pashtuns are known for dancing with their guns and/or swords. Also known as Khyber sword dance.

A popular Sindhi folk dance usually done when somebody returns home victorious

Balochi Folk Dance: Baloch people give a great importance to the occasion of birth. The occasion is celebrated by music, singing and dancing.

Bhangra: folk dance of Punjab is the bhangra which is described as being like rock and roll and which is always done at the beginning of the harvest season.

Wakhi Dance: Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan

Wakhi children dance at Wakhi Cultural Festival at Lok Virsa, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Kalash Dance from Kalash Valley, Pakistan

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