The 13 Point Dossier! Were Pakistan Cheated?

When an umpire makes one bad decision against your team, you accept it as human error and move on…..may be if he makes a 2nd one you feel hes just having a bad day…..but 13 bad decisions against one team…..and these r no silly decisions.



1- 4th ODI – Umar gul being called for no ball = free hit…..thats possibly 7 extra runs.

2- 3rd ODI – Afridi being referred after being originally given not out…..Afridi could have made a big difference in that innings as we all know.He was 34(29). Pakistan were 185-6 and had 11 overs to go and no power play taken. pakistan only made 242 in the end.

3- 3rd ODI – Luke Wright given not out stumped – england were 178-5 at that stage with only another 64 needed. Wright finished on 48 not out.

4- 1st ODI – Trott was on 26 when Billy Doctrove missed an edge of Ajmal – He went on to make 69.

5- 2nd ODI – Strauss Nicked Umar Gul, Caught by Kamran Akmal – 38* at the time – Strauss went on to make 126 and win England the match.

6- 5th ODI – Collingwood LBW B gul – England 150-4 Key Position in the match – England went on to make 256, Collingwood finishing on 47.

7- 5th ODI – Doctrove calling Shoaib for a wide (hilarious) – penalty one run against Shoaibs Name (could be costly later on in life when pundits mull over strike rates etc)

8- 2nd ODI – Afridi LBW not given against Trott – Trott finished on 53. score went from 114-1 to 189 before he got out.

9- 2nd ODI – Hafeez LBW not give against Trott – Didnt cost anything for once as prat got himself run out on the same ball.

10- 3rd ODI – Mohammed Yousuf LBW – FLAT Batting Track – given out on 16 off 22…..who knows what would have happened had he stayed. Pakistan only made 241.

11- 5th ODI – Kamran Akmal given LBW – The Ball clearly hit the bat. He made 41(53), Score was 80-2 off 18 overs chasing 256… Batsman was set.

12- 4th ODI – Strauss Plumb LBW to Hafeez not given. Strauss was on 41. Went on to make 68.

13- 2nd ODI – Kamran Akmal given out LBW on 74(72). Benefit of doubt should have been given. too close a decision to call. Pakistan were on 122-0 (22 Overs)

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What about Umpire-fixing?

By Michelle Beckett

If the umpire gives a poor decision, it is usually considered to a human error, and the man responsible of upholding equality in a game of cricket is easily set off the hook. Sometimes these so-called human errors increase in frequency and occur at crucial moments that turn the result of important matches.

It is unfair why the referral system has not been introduced in the one-day international matches, and the on-field umpires are given the freedom to solely judge and give decisions.

In the tour of England, innumerable allegations were imposed on Pakistan regarding spot-fixing. Two of Pakistan top fast bowlers Mohammad Amir and Mohammad Asif, under the captaincy of Salman Butt were alleged to have deliberately bowled no-balls in the test match against England at Lords. This news created shock waves around the world of cricket. It has been almost a month since the spot-fixing allegations brought forth by the British tabloid newspaper ‘News of the World’ came to light and not even a single piece of evidence has been found against the Pakistani players till date. Even then, they have been prematurely suspended by the International Cricket Council (ICC).

The British media and the ICC have focused a bit too much on the entire spot-fixing issue, but what about the blatant umpire-fixing that seems quite evident on television screens during the one-day matches?

Several poor decisions were given in the last one-day match between Pakistan and England. Most of them went in favour of England. The no-ball bowled by Amir and Asif were blown to crazy proportions by both the ICC and the British media, but what about the so-called no ball given by the umpire during the 5th ODI, which was clearly not a no ball. By giving this decision, the umpire allowed a free hit which could have proved costly for Pakistan, but fortunately for Pakistan, Umar Gul was able to bowl a good delivery which did not give any runs.

Secondly, there was a stumping appeal against Luke Wright but it was dismissed by umpire Billy Doctrove and was not referred to the third umpire despite repeated appeals by Umar Akmal (who had replaced Kamran Akmal as wicket-keeper due to Kamran Akmal’s finger injury). Shahid Afridi argued with Billy Doctrove furiously as he did not understand why the decision was not being referred to the third umpire.

And that’s not all. Captain Andrew Strauss, who was in top form and was the most dangerous player of the English side, was plum LBW (leg before the wicket) but was given not-out. It was the most crucial wicket for Pakistan as Strauss continued to attack Pakistani bowlers despite wickets falling on the other end. Mohammad Hafeez, the bowler, could just not believe it. Even Strauss was sure that he was out as he was heading towards the pavilion. But the umpire, who was British by nationality, closed his eyes and jerked his head. This was yet another shock for Pakistan.

So what would one call this? The two games that Pakistan did win were not dependent on the umpire’s rulings as most of the wickets were taken when the batmen was either bowled or caught.

It really makes one wonder that is the ICC taking a notice of this? Can they not see how the umpires turned a blind eye to Pakistan’s appeals? And what about the blatant no-ball decision given by the umpire when it was clearly not a no-ball? The spot-fixing no-balls were really noticed to the point that the poor players were suspended without proof. What sort of justice is this? The ICC has really proved to be a pure western body so far where most of the problems faced by Asian countries seem to go unnoticed. One cannot help but sense double-standards prevalent in the body which is there to support cricket for all.

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>>English Umpires Match Fixing Against Pakistan

Tabloid drama makes ICC dance to its tunes

LAHORE – Pakistan team’s eventful tour of England will remain chiselled in the memories of national team players for the rest of their lives.

Cheaters if they win, fixers if they lose, they are now wondering what to do?

Amid all the tabloid drama that has made the ICC dance to its tunes, cricket is the ultimate loser. Though the Pakistan cricket is fast moving towards isolation, the game internationally is too dwindling into darkness. The ICC’s anti-corruption unit is only making itself a subject of ridicule by launching inquiries after every tabloid report.

They have suspended the three Pakistan players who are yet to be found guilty. But on the other hand, they have remained unmoved on reports of fixing in the IPL matches and the players alleged for involvement were not even called for questioning. It seems their focus is only the Pakistan team.

Instead of waiting for results of the inquiries already under progress, the ICC started yet another investigation on tabloid report without even taking the PCB and the ECB in to confidence.

The strained meeting of the PCB chief and ICC Chief Executive Haroon Lorgat recently has also strained the relations between the PCB and the ECB with Ijaz Butt calling for investigation of a losing England team.

The British media declared that the South African players did not want to play against Pakistan in UAE, but the South African board clearly denied.

Just with one statement of the PCB chief, the ECB and its players have now reacted severely – one wonders Pakistan players have been facing this for quite sometime now. And even the on field umpires during the fourth ODI between the two sides acted quite differently leaving the Pakistan team high and dry on some confident appeals, which were declared even by expert commentators as umpiring errors.

Maybe those who control the game in the ICC have now decided to isolate Pakistan once for all. When Sri Lankan team was attacked, it seemed they had succeeded somewhat but Pakistan gave them a befitting reply by winning the ICC World T20 title.

But ever since the PCB alienated the powers that be by voting against John Howard’s nominations in the ICC, it was only a matter of time that Pakistan was taught a lesson. The News of the World is part of the group that controls a large part of Australian media which was also supportive of John Howard in his election campaigns.

This group, known for its bias towards Muslims in general and Pakistan in particular, is very influential in the USA and the UK. It is also worth a mention that former Australian Prime Minister John Howard was a close friend of US President George W Bush. Read more of this post

Pakistan through to semis after beating India












CENTURION: Shoaib Malik and Mohammad Yousuf shared a record fourth-wicket stand to help Pakistan beat India by 54 runs on Saturday to reach the Champions Trophy semi-finals.

Pakistan compiled 302 for nine after winning the toss and batting before restricting their arch rivals to 248 all out.

The victory led Pakistan to the top of Group A with four points from two matches ahead of Australia on two. India and West Indies have no points.

Shoaib (128) and Yousuf (87) put on 206 in 193 balls, the biggest stand for any wicket in the Champions Trophy and a fourth-wicket record for Pakistan.

The previous record in the competition was 192 for the first wicket, shared by Indians Virender Sehwag and Saurav Ganguly against England in Colombo in 2002 and Chris Gayle and Wavell Hinds for West Indies against Bangladesh in Southampton in 2004.

Pakistan’s previous best for the fourth wicket was an unbroken stand of 198 between Kamran Akmal and Misbah ul-Haq against Australia in Abu Dhabi earlier this year.

Shoaib cracked 128 in 126 deliveries, with 16 fours, to record his seventh ODI century. The 27-year-old really hit form in the latter stages of his innings, needing just 27 deliveries for his second 50.

Yousuf’s 87 featured seven fours in a classy display of wristy stroke making.

Left-arm seamer Ashish Nehra struck twice with the new ball for India and finished with four for 55.

However he had little support, with only Ishant Sharma pegging back the Pakistan batsmen with two for 39.

Rahul Dravid top-scored for India with 76 before being runout in the 42nd over, Umar Gul’s fine throw from the cover boundary beating him after Harbhajan Singh had called for a third run.

India were given a powerful start by Gautam Gambhir, who lashed 57 off 46 balls, while Suresh Raina added 46 in 41deliveries.

Pakistan, though, eventually cruised to victory after claiming the last five wickets for 43 runs.

Naved ul-Hasan, Shahid Afridi and Saeed Ajmal all picked up two wickets.

Seventeen-year-old fast bowler Mohammad Aamer also grabbed two for 46 including Sachin Tendulkar for eight.

Pakistan's Road To Glory

Cornered tigers roar once again

Pakistan T20 ChampionPak championpak_team_celeb6pak_team_celeb2Shahid Khan AfridiAfridiUmar Gulfans_celeb_pak_glory8Pak fans

A Pakistan with momentum is a beast that cannot be contained. England discovered that fact to their cost in 1992 at Melbourne, when Imran Khan’s cornered tigers sprung at their throats to seize the country’s first major global title. And now, a generation later but in a campaign of distinct and glorious parallels, Sri Lanka have also sampled the unstoppable alchemy that occurs when cricket’s most emotional and temperamental participants find a way to meld their ambitions to their deeds.

It doesn’t always end up this way. Two years ago against India, in the inaugural World Twenty20 final in Johannesburg, Pakistan blew their chance for glory when Misbah-ul-Haq choked on his emotions at the end of a stunning match-turning counterattack, and chose the wrong ball to flick over fine leg. And then, of course, there was Pakistan’s last appearance in the 50-over World Cup final, against Australia right here at Lord’s in 1999, when the conviction in the performance and the margin in the result – eight wickets – exactly mirrored today’s effect and upshot.

In fact, it is a decade and a day since Pakistan’s demolition at the hands of Australia, and only two players remain from that match. Abdul Razzaq bowled two overs that day for 13, having limped to 17 from 51 balls while batting at No. 3; Shahid Afridi flogged two fours in 16 balls, and wasn’t called upon to put his legspin into practice. Ten years and a thousand memories later, Razzaq and Afridi rose to the needs of the hour and turned themselves into the game’s critical performers. Like the identities of the teams in this poignant final, it was a detail that can only have been scripted by the fates.

“Me, Shahid and Razzaq, we were chatting with the guys: ‘Please this time we will hold our nerves and make our final touch’,” said Younis, who added how surprised he had been by the maturity of Afridi’s batting. “He took singles,” he said in admiration of a man who added calculation to his aggression, and paced the chase to perfection. Two lusty swipes into the stands thrilled a packed Lord’s, but not half as much as the scruffy leg-bye with which the title was sealed. Rare is the Pakistan team that puts substance over style, but when it occurs, the overall effect is electrifying.

As for Razzaq, he had his own reasons to impress – his omission from the last World Twenty20 in South Africa was the catalyst for his defection to the ICL, which in turn led to his two-year exile from international cricket. He cut through the red tape last month, but only returned as a replacement for the injured Yasir Arafat last week. Nevertheless, he slipped effortlessly into his time-honoured utility role, this time as an under-rated old hand to balance the youthful aggression of Wasim Akram’s acolyte, Mohammad Aamer. After nine deliveries of the final, old and young had claimed a pair of ducks between them. And those lead weights of expectation had been alchemised into gold.

Younis has now stepped aside from Twenty20 cricket, much as Imran Khan bowed out on a high in 1992. For all his quiet insistence that this competition lacks the prestige of the 50-over World Cup, he knows that he and his players have achieved something wonderful, and every bit as lasting as the memories forged by Imran, Miandad, Wasim and Mushtaq, way back in the mists of time.

“I’m the second Khan winning a World Cup for Pakistan, so I’m very proud of my Khans,” said Younis. “This is my dream. I dreamed all the time of lifting the World Cup. My thinking in all my career is that I will be remembered for a team like 1992. I was not in the Imran Khan team, and this is a dream come true. I’m really happy. Though this World Cup is Twenty20, at least we won our second World Cup. This is a gift to our whole nation.”

He is not wrong. To get a sense of how much Pakistan needed this victory, you have to look beyond the bedlam in the stands at Lord’s where a shimmer of bouncing green shirts gave a surface-level glimpse of the euphoria, and instead burrow deep into the parks and gullies of Karachi, Rawalpindi, Lahore and Peshawar, where a nation starved of joy has been given the timeliest succour. It is arguable, in fact, that there has been no more timely sporting victory since a newly unified South Africa won the Rugby World Cup back in 1995.

Where Francois Pienaar’s Springboks drew a newly unified nation ever more tightly together, the achievement of Younis’s men has been to help slow the fragmentation of a state that is rapidly being considered by the world at large to have failed. Both the captain and his Man of the Match hail from the troubled North West Frontier Province, and Afridi himself from the Khyber Agency, the symbolic frontline of Pakistan’s War on Terror. Chaos can seem at times to be embedded in the Pakistani DNA, but as both men showed in their performances in this tournament, it does not have to be this way.

“If you see the whole nation, where law and order is not good, we are from them,” said Younis. “How can we be consistent? With these kind of things going for us, if you see our cricket it is all the time suffering from a lot of things. After that we are still winning the World Cup. It is a great achievement for us. I am requesting to all of the countries you must come to Pakistan. Everybody knows law and order is not good but it is not our fault.”

For the moment, any prospect of cricket resuming in Pakistan is futile, despite the joy of this occasion and the hope for the future that it generates. But in the shorter term, what we witnessed at Lord’s today was the will of a troubled nation to pull in the same direction. From the fight within the team to the reaction around the stands, it was clear how much the notion of Pakistan still means. Next summer, the prospect exists of England hosting their “home” Test series against Australia. Today was a taster of the euphoria that would bring. It must be allowed to happen.

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Pakistan Through To Cricket World Twenty20 Final

Shahid Afridi celebrates a wicket

Shahid Afridi celebrates a wicket

Pakistan 149-4 (Shahid Afridi 51, Shoiab Malik 34) beat
South Africa 142-5 (Jacques Kallis 64, Afridi 2-16) by 7 runs

Pakistan all-rounder Shahid Afridi could not have picked a better time to return to form as a half-century and two wickets from him helped his side beat South Africa by seven runs to seal a spot in the ICC World Twenty20 final.

Afridi smashed 51 in 34 balls to propel Pakistan to 149 for four and then took two wickets, bowling his four overs for just 16 runs as South Africa closed on 142 for five as they wrote another unwanted chapter in their history of semi-final losses.

Afridi was simply brilliant, promoted to bat at number three after Shahzaib Hasan fell for a two-ball duck, hitting eight fours, including hitting Johan Botha out of the attack with three in three balls as he built on a superb start given to Pakistan after first Younus Khan had won the toss and chosen to bat and Kamran Akmal crashed 23 in 12 balls.

Steyn had Akmal caught in the third over before Afridi and Shoiab Malik (34) added 67 for the third wicket and it was a relieved South Africa when he departed, caught by AB de Villiers as he tried to hit JP Duminy’s first ball out of the park.

Younus Khan scored an unbeaten 24 in 18 balls while Abdul Razzaq was unbeaten on 12 at the end of the innings.

South Africa set off at a good pace, Jacques Kallis (64) dominating an opening stand of 40 before Graeme Smith was well held by 17-year-old Mohammad Aamer off his own bowling. Having watched Umar Gul miss a chance earlier on, Aamer was in no mood to let anyone else near it and that set up the Afridi show, part two.

He bowled Herschelle Gibbs (5) and de Villiers (1) to leave the match in the balance with South Africa at 50 for three but a half-century stand between Kallis and Duminy, who was unbeaten on 44, kept the Proteas in the game. To a certain degree, it also kept Pakistan in contention, because the runs weren’t coming quickly enough, despite the pair sharing ten fours and two sixes.

Umar Gul played his part, spearing his yorkers in to keep the runs down and it was Saeed Ajmal who grabbed the breakthrough when Kallis, who had just helped smash Fawad Alam for 15 runs in his one over, offered a high catch which was gratefully and skilfully held by Shoaib Malik.

That brought Albie Morkel to the crease, but the task was too much even for him and although Duminy hit Aamer, a bold choice to bowl the final over, for a six over midwicket, the left-armer bounced back and when Morkel was run out by Alam with a direct hit from long-off, it was effectively game over.

All Aamer had to do was hold his nerve; he did, Pakistan held on to win a thriller and now they have a shot at redemption after they lost to rivals India by just five runs in South Africa in 2007.

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